2008 Technology Roundtable

The 2008 Technology Roundtable is designed as a discussion of 18 participants. Phil Weiser, University of Colorado professor of law and telecommunications and executive director of the Silicon Flatirons Center, will lead the Technology Roundtable, encouraging a dynamic, substantive interchange among the participants. Seated in a venue with a capacity for 200 persons, the audience for the Technology Roundtable will be by invitation and include individuals with a particular interest in the subject of technology.

Tags: Content/IP / Technology Policy

Introduction

The 2008 Technology Roundtable is designed as a discussion of 18 participants. Phil Weiser, University of Colorado professor of law and telecommunications and executive director of the Silicon Flatirons Center, will lead the Technology Roundtable, encouraging a dynamic, substantive interchange among the participants. Seated in a venue with a capacity for 200 persons, the audience for the Technology Roundtable will be by invitation and include individuals with a particular interest in the subject of technology.

Roundtable Focus

This Roundtable will discuss the technology-related challenges and opportunities our country faces in the years ahead. The first session will take up the natural question after an election where the Internet transformed the way politics is practiced in this country: how can the Internet and technological changes transform the way the federal government operates. In so doing, it will discuss how the federal government can use emerging technologies to operate more efficiently and serve the public more effectively. In particular, it will discuss, among other things, proposals ranging from the call to install a Chief Technology Officer at the federal government, the challenges around upgrading the technologies used by first responders, opportunities to develop a strategy for public media in the digital age, and how the government can embrace “Web 2.0”-type technologies to best share information with the public and solicit its input.

The second session will address the question of what strategies that the federal government can use to promote technological development and innovation. In particular, it will evaluate what public policies can best spur capital formation and protect the U.S. advantage in that area; what educations reforms, particularly as to math and science education, can prepare a next generation of engineers and business persons; and what innovation policies, be they support for basic research or patent law reform can spur greater levels of technological development.

The final session will evaluate whether and how to best enable U.S. consumers to reap the benefits and opportunities of the Internet age. It will thus evaluate the related questions of whether all Americans are equipped to participate in the information age and what set of broadband policies should be pursued by the next administration. The session will also discuss to what extent competition in broadband and telecommunications markets has developed in the wake of the 1996 Act and what reforms–to both the regulation of wired and wireless networks–are appropriate. Finally, the panel will discuss whether consumers are prepared for the challenges raised by the Internet–fending off denial of service attacks, viruses, breaches of their privacy, etc.–and what, if anything, government should do about such concerns.


Sessions

Welcome
Government 2.0
  • Kathryn C. Brown
    Senior Vice President, Public Policy & Corporate Responsibility, Verizon
  • Don Gips
    Group VP for Corporate Strategy, Level 3 Communications
  • Ellen P. Goodman
    Professor of Law, Rutgers Law School
  • Reed Hundt
    Senior Advisor, McKinsey
  • Andrew McLaughlin
    United States Deputy Chief Technology Officer
  • Joe Samuel
    Senior Vice President, First Data Corp.
Promoting the Next Wave of Innovation
  • John Seely Brown
    Independent Co-Chairman, Deloitte Center for Edge Innovation
  • Bill Kennard
    Managing Director, Carlyle Group
  • Charles Ergen
    Chairman, DISH Network
  • Brad Feld
    Managing Director, Foundry Group
  • Don Rosenberg
    Executive Vice President, General Counsel, & Corporate Secretary, Qualcomm
  • Charles Phillips
    President, Oracle
  • David Thompson
    Group President of Information Technology and Services, Symantec
  • Honorable Zoe Lofgren
    Congresswoman, U.S. House of Representatives
Internet Policy in a New Era: How Best to Protect Competition and Consumers?
  • Dorothy Attwood
    Senior Vice President, Walt Disney Company
  • Larissa Herda
    Chairman, CEO, and President, tw telecom inc.
  • Larry Irving
    President, Irving Group
  • Michael Katz
    Professor of Economics and Business, New York University
  • Jack Krumholtz
    Managing Director, Federal Government Affairs, Microsoft
  • Pieter Poll
    CTO, Qwest
Keynote Remarks
  • Jay Rockefeller
    U.S. Senator, West Virginia

Know What’s Next